RSP Writers Project: Matt Miller’s Roster – Bleacher Report


Matt Miller’s cornerstone at left tackle will be Nate Solder, a player capable of guarding his most prized investment – Andrew Luck. Photo by Beth Hart.

Bleacher Report’s NFL Draft Lead Writer, Matt Miller is the founder of the NFL draft site New Era Scouting. Matt’s work has been featured in Madden 13, on ESPN radio, SiriusXM, NFL.com, SI.com, and USA Today. NFL, CFL and AFL teams have utilized his services. Matt was the secondary and special teams coordinator for the three-time league champion Joplin Crusaders of the Central Football League.

Miller presents his roster with the unwavering belief that he selected personnel that will be the makings of a great football team – not to mention the bravado to believe he got tremendous value with players at the higher end of this exercise’s pay scale.  Readers may see it as spin typical of NFL owners and GMs heading into training camp, but what I like is Miller’s steadfast belief in players that may not have lived up to initial expectations. It’s an indication that Miller stands by his work as an evaluator.

Offense

Quarterback Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and/or fit within the system)
QB1 Andrew Luck 12.5 The best quarterback prospect to enter the NFL since at least John Elway. At $12.5M, Luck was a bargain and gives our team a future at the position without having to worry about using money on a back-up/replacement.
QB3 Chase Daniel 1 Daniel is a smart, accurate, mobile quarterback who gives us a quarterback that can run the same offense as Luck.
QB2 Stephen McGee 0.5 Like Daniel, McGee allows us to run the same offense, but gives more athletic ability and is a run threat with good developmental potential.
Running Back Depth Chart

Matt Miller is head over heels for Javon Ringer – or at least confident in Ringer’s ability to be a productive starter in his zone blocking scheme. Photo by SpartanJoe.

Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
RB1 Javon Ringer 2 Hidden behind Chris Johnson, Ringer has played very well when asked to. Behind our big offensive line and in a pass-first offense, his ability as a play-action back and tough, between-the-tackles running was a must-have. He’s a huge value at $2 million.
RB2 Chris Polk 2.5 A big bruiser that we can plug in around the goal line, Polk game at low cost with high upside to be a potential starter.
RB3 Montell Owens 0.5 A hybrid player that we’ll use in goal line and heavy sets, but also has special teams value.
Wide Receiver Depth Chart

Miller believes Eddie Royal can perform Wes Welker’s role in his offense. Photo by Jeffery Beall.

Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
WR1 Mike Wallace 7 A deep threat at a value cost, Wallace will open the offense for Luck and our other targets with his ability to stretch the field.
WR2 Alshon Jeffery 5.5 Potentially the best rookie receiver available, and at a low cost. Jeffery is a big threat who will be Luck’s No. 1 red zone target.
WR3 Eddie Royal 2.5 A deadly slot receiver and return man, Royal is our Wes Welker clone.
WR4 Kerry Meier 1 Injured in his rookie season, Meier is a great all-around athlete that will excel on inside routes and as a special teams player.
WR5 Quan Cosby 1 Cosby gives depth in the slot and adds return skills at a very low cost. He fits the team’s M.O. of finding quick, shifty slot receivers that can also return kicks and punts.
WR6 Ryan Whalen 0.5 A developmental player familiar with Luck from his days at Stanford. A depth pick.
Fullback and Tight End Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
TE1 Britt Miller 0.5 Our starting fullback, this converted linebacker is a bruiser that can pick up blitzes and also catch passes out of the backfield. He’s also loaded with potential.
TE2 Coby Fleener 2.5 Giving Luck someone he’s comfortable with was a goal here, but putting Fleener between deep threats Wallace and Jeffery will make this vertical offense impossible to cover with a conventional defense.
Evan Rodriguez 1.5 Another athletic, versatile player who will fill our “Aaron Hernandez” role. Rodriguez will see snaps at tight end, in the slot at wide receiver and even in the backfield.
Zach Potter 0.5 More of a blocker than the other tight ends, Potter will see time in three-tight sets and around the goal line. He’s also a good special teams fit.
Tackle Depth Chart

Is Eric Winston a steal at $8 million? Matt Miller thinks so. Photo by The Brit_2.

Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
 LT Nate Solder 9 One of the top young tackles in the NFL, Solder will make sure that Andrew Luck has time to make plays in his rookie season. We wanted a young left tackle to grow with Luck, Solder was the best available.
Jonathan Scott 1 Scott isn’t great, and we didn’t have much money left, but he is versatile and can fill in at multiple positions.
 RT Eric Winston 8.5 My top-rated right tackle, getting Winston for just $8.5 million was too good to pass up. With Solder and Winston, our tackles are athletic and tough at the point of attack for a zone blocking scheme.
Lydon Murtha 1 A big bruiser in the run game, Murtha is a solid depth tackle who could develop into a solid role player.
Guard Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
 LG Kelechi Osemele 6 Athletic enough to play guard or tackle, Osemele’s footwork and strength make him an ideal left guard in our zone blocking scheme.
 RG Harvey Dahl 3.5 Dahl was among the best in the game with Atlanta, and he’s familiar with our zone blocking scheme. Forget the poor play in St. Louis, Dahl is legit.
Joe Reitz 1.5 Reitz is a solid wave guard that can fill in at right or left guard as needed.
Center Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
Eric Wood 4.5 One of the top young centers in the NFL, Wood is a quality run and pass protector that will anchor our offensive line and the zone blocking scheme implemented.
JD Walton 1 A good backup that is over-matched as a starter, Walton has experience in the zone blocking scheme and is a good value here.

Defense and Special Teams

I’m astonished this is the first time I’ve seen a team with Patrick Willis on the roster. Thank you Matt Miller for resolving what could have been an emerging travesty for the RSP Writers Project. Photo by  Tim Gallagher.

Cornerback and Safety Depth Chart

Miller believes cornerback Tramon Williams will rebound from a sub par 2010 season. Photo by Tyle_r

Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and/or fit within the system)
 Tramon Williams 6 Injured in 2011, Williams’ play declined, but he’s still among the better man coverage corners in the NFL.
 William Middleton 0.5 An underrated stud that is a steal at $500k, Middleton will be our right cornerback and he will take on the WR2 in man coverage.
 Brice McCain 1 One of the best slot corners in the league, McCain will be our nickel corner and should see a high number of snaps in the pass-happy NFL.
 Darius Butler 0.5 A developmental player who we can put on nickel and dime duty, while also running him as a gunner on punt team.
 Jarrett Bush 0.5 A good No. 4 cornerback who has some ability to slide in at safety if needed. A utility defender.
 Roderick Hood 0.5 The lone veteran of the group, Hood is signed as a locker room presence with a young secondary.
 Eric Weddle 5.5 The best free safety in the NFL, Weddle will attack the ball in flight while our corners take away the receivers in zero coverage.
 Sterling Moore 0.5 A good backup, Moore can step in play either safety spot as well as help out in coverage if needed.
Harrison Smith 2.5 Smith is young enough to develop into a stud, and he’s also cheap. Combined with Weddle, our safeties can run and hit well while still making plays on the ball.
 Brandon Meriweather 0.5 A bit of a wildcard, but Meriweather is a good No. 3 safety who can add depth and experience.

Linebacker Depth Chart

Von Miller and Aldon Smith on the same team? Opposing offenses better be able to run and it better have serious skill protecting the edges. Photo by Jeffery Beall.

Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
 Aldon Smith 9.5 Smith is an attacking pass rusher from the outside and will be our weak side linebacker, limiting his coverage responsibilities as an every down player.
 Von Miller 9.5 Miller slides in at strong outside linebacker, but he’s a pass rusher first and foremost. Our two outside linebackers totaled 25.5 sacks in their rookie seasons. This defense is built to go get the quarterback.
 Patrick Willis 9.5 The best 3-4 “MIKE” in the game, Willis is our captain and leader of a young, fast, attacking defense.
 Mark Herzlich 1 The “TED” in our 3-4, Herzlich will absorb blocks and allow Willis to make plays, while he’s also athletic enough to get back in coverage and run down backs.
Vontaze Burfict 1 A gamble, but a cheap one. If Burfict responds to coaching, he’s a steal at $1 million.
 Quentin Groves 0.5 A role player only, Groves fills in as the No. 4 pass rusher on the depth chart. A former draft bust we’re hoping to rehab.
 Andy Studebaker 0.5 A utility player in Kansas City, Studebaker can spell either starter and even bring some heat as a third-down pass rusher.
 Bobby Carpenter 0.5 Able to play inside or outside linebacker, Carpenter will line up behind Willis and Herzlich to start the season.
 Jermaine Cunningham 0.5 Another athletic pass rusher that didn’t pan out with his first team, Cunningham is a cheap developmental player who can give us depth in case of injury.
Defensive End and Tackle Depth Chart

Rookie Mike Martin will be counted on to hold down the middle. Photo by Missy Caulk.

Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
 Justin Smith 11 The best 3-4 defensive end in football, Smith will set the tone for the defense with his high-motor pass rushing and non-stop play making.
 Phillip Merling 0.5 A former draft bust, Merling is a good depth player at defensive end. We’re not asking much from him for $500k.
 Paul Kruger 3.5 Underrated in Baltimore, Kruger’s athleticism allows us to get to the quarterback and also gives the defense flexibility to shift to a four-man front.
 Tyson Jackson 1.5 Jackson hasn’t been elite in Kansas City, but he’s a good defensive end that we hope can be Smith’s understudy and provide great depth when spelling the All-Pro.
Mike Martin 2.5 A rookie nose tackle, Martin has the strength to draw double teams and let our athletes get to the ball. He’ll free up Smith and Kruger to make plays.
 Letroy Guion 0.5 Depth at nose tackle, Guion can run in and handle the zero-tech for a few series if our youngster gets tired.
Final Special Teams Roster
 Britt MillerZach Potter

Kerry Meier

Quan Cosby

Ryan Whalen

Lydon Murtha

Jonathan Scott

Joe Reitz

JD Walton

Darius Butler

 

Kicker and Punter Depth Chart
Starters Name Value Commentary (Why did you choose the player for special teams and what Role (optional) will he play?)
K1 Neil Rackers 1.5 A low-cost option, but a reliable kicker who has experience in big games.
P1 Ben Graham 1 Graham looked like a steal to us at $1M…but then again, we don’t plan on punting much.
Categories: RSP Writers ProjectTags: , , , , , , , , ,

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