RSP Writers Roster: DraftBreakdown’s Eric Stoner


Eric Stoner’s RSP roster includes “the moveable chess piece,” Aaron Hernandez, who might be the team’s least dangerous receiving threat when it’s all said and done. Photo by Patriotworld.

Eric Stoner is a legal assistant by day, and a writer and video guy for DraftBreakdown.com for the remaining hours he’s awake. He specializes in quarterback evaluation. His YouTube videos are a quality service for football fans seeking more than the typical highlight packages that fans put together of college stars. Stoner’s videos are actually more like cutups of every play in a game. He’s also one of the more active draftniks on Twitter (@ECStoner). And wait until you see his Q&A – perhaps the best I’ve seen thus far and that’s saying something with this group.

Eric Stoner’s RSP Writers Project Team

I enjoy interacting with Eric Stoner on Twitter. It figures we both have Randy Moss, and a player I’d consider the defensive secondary version of Moss, on our teams. Photo by Jack Newton.

I haven’t revealed my team, but Stoner and I share two star players when comparing mine with his – Randy Moss and Darrelle Revis. His team has the firepower to dominate in the passing game if his offensive line can provide Aaron Rodgers enough time to make plays. I think the line would get the job done, but I’m sure he’d like to know your thoughts once you see his team, and later tomorrow, his Q&A.

Defensively, I think Stoner is relying on youth with Darrelle Revis as a mighty-fine booster seat to get this unit to the big boy’s table. I’d like to thank Stoner for sharing his team with us. If you’d like to share your team, feel free to complete the spreadsheet and Q&A. I can’t guarantee I’ll post it, but I’ve posted several (Eric, Nick Whalen’s, and 5-ish’s) on quality of effort I’ve seen thus far. Although two of the three listed are writers for other sites, they were wildcard entries and not scheduled guests.

Offensive Unit

Aaron Rodgers is the total package and Eric Stoner provides him great skill players adept at the vertical and back shoulder game. A match made in heaven. Photo by Elvis Kennedy.

Quarterback Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and/or fit within the system)
QB1 Aaron Rodgers 20 The best quarterback in the NFL, period.  Capable of playing in almost any type of offense.  Can destroy teams in the rhythm passing game with his elite anticipation and timing as well as stretch the defense in all areas of the field in the vertical passing game.  Four verticals will be our base pass concept (Rodgers’ ability to read and hit the back shoulder fade will make this virtually unstoppable).  We will try to run vertical stem pass plays most of the time so everything looks the same until the receivers make their breaks.
QB3 Chandler Harnish 1 Rookie backup to groom behind Rodgers.  If he plays this year, we’re screwed.
Running Back Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
RB1 Lamar Miller 5 Outside zone.  Outside zone.  Outside zone.  Think (young) Edgerrin James here.
RB2 Chris Ivory 2 An absolute bull to bring down.  Not a factor in the passing game whatsoever – so if he’s in the game, the defense will know he’s getting the ball.
RB3 Javon Ringer 2 A high effort player who also pass blocks well.
Wide Receiver Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
WR1 Randy Moss 5 I’ll take the gamble that he’ll be motivated to play in a vertical stem offense with a quarterback who can fire it all over the field. If there’s anything in those legs whatsoever, he becomes a ridiculous threat in this offense.  We can utilize him a lot as a vertical stem slot receiver.  It will give him a clean release at the line, and (with his incredible football IQ) we can give him a ton of options on seam reads based on the D’s leverage.
WR2 Returner Denarius Moore 5.5 Greg Jennings all over again.  A little raw as a route runner, but he can get down field and has elite ball skills.  Doubles as a punt returner.  We want to get the ball in his hands as much as possible.
WR3 Malcolm Floyd 4.5 Personally, I believe Malcolm Floyd has been the better outside receiver in San Diego over the last few seasons.  His biggest problem has been health.  Again, he’s another vertical stem guy who can go up and get the football.
WR4 Returner Emmanuel Sanders 3.5 Speed and returning ability.  Got shelved for a bit in Pittsburgh, but looks every bit the part of a speedy, elusive target.
WR5 Jerricho Cotchery 3 The only guy out of this group we can rely consistently on in 3rd and 5.  Will make tough catches over the middle.  Makes himself available to quarterbacks.
WR6 Louis Murphy 1.5 Has been injury-prone, but he’s another guy that can get down field.  Can play both inside and outside.
Fullback and Tight End Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
TE1 H-Back Aaron Hernandez 5.5 The movable chess piece. We’ll try to limit his exposure on the line of scrimmage against monster defensive linemen, but he can do everything else – flex, play slot, outside receiver, H-back, and even run the ball a little bit.
TE2 Kevin Boss 1.5 Inline blocker who’s better than you’d think at getting down the seam.
James Hanna 0.5 Big and fast. Worth developing – could be a major receiving threat in a few years.
Tom Crabtree 0.5 Do-it-all tight end who’ll play special teams as well.
RB Jason Snelling 1 Not so much a lead blocker as a 3rd down back who is reliable in pass pro.
Tackle Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
 LT Branden Albert 6 College guard who has had an up-and-down beginning to his career, but came into his own last year. Excellent run blocker. Underrated in pass protection and really progressed in this area in 2011 according to Pro Football Focus grades – has suffered from having quarterbacks with terrible pocket presence.  Won’t be hung out to dry in this offense.
 RT Todd Herremans 5 Another former guard who made the conversion to right tackle last year – during last year’s shortened training camp no less. Another nasty run-blocker who is underrated as a pass blocker – protected Michael Vick’s blindside last year, which isn’t an easy task. Howard Mudd installed a zone blocking scheme in Philadelphia last year, and he handled it very well.
Bobby Massie 3 Developmental swing tackle who was a favorite of the internet draft community.  Long, lean, and nasty in the run game.  Excellent instincts for the position. Works off the double team well and picks up defenders on the second level consistently. Somewhat stiff, though – can he move laterally well enough to play in this scheme?
Guard Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
 LG Antoine Caldwell 2.5 Has been groomed in Houston’s zone blocking scheme.  Doesn’t have a lot of experience, but has played very when he has gotten the opportunity.  Center convert who can back that position up.
 RG Wade Smith 1.5 The other Houston guard.  ProFootballFocus says he had a Pro Bowl year in 2010 with a terrible outing in 2011.  Here’s hoping he can bounce back to 2011 form.
Maurice Hurt 1 Played guard and tackle in college.  Developmental backup.
Ryan Wendell 0.5 Been a long-term backup at both guard and center for New England his entire career. Hasn’t played a lot, but he’s stuck around and consistently made their roster.
Center Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
Max Unger 5 Big enough to handle monster nose tackles in today’s NFL.  An excellent pass blocker to boot.
Matt Tennant 1 I liked him a lot coming out of Boston College. Essentially red-shirted in New Orleans last year.

Defensive and Special Teams Units

Stoner describes OLB/DE Travis LaBoy as the homeless man’s version of the player starting for his roster at this position. See below. Photo by Jeffery Beall.

Cornerback and Safety Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and/or fit within the system)
LCB1  Darrelle Revis 12 Arguably the best defensive player in football. Let him shadow the other team’s best receiver and shut them down. Not afraid to mix it up against the run, either.
RCB1  Derek Cox 5.5 Has only played RCB and has been injury prone.  However, he turned a corner last season and showed the makings of being a great press-man corner. Ended the 2011 season on injured reserve.
LCB2 Nickel CB Janoris Jenkins 6 Fiesty corner who can play (and potentially star) at either the nickel or outside corner spot.  Aggressive in run support, and has elite man coverage potential. Shadowed Julio Jones and AJ Green in college and shut them both down. Also a punt returner.
RCB2  William Middleton 0.5 Has played both outside corner and nickel as a reserve for Jacksonville (often in Derek Cox’s absence). Valuable backup who can play special teams.  Jacksonville tends to play more zone when Middleton plays heavy snaps for them.  He performs well, but it raises some questions about his man coverage ability.
 Curtis Marsh 0.5 Showed some press-man skills in college. Developmental outside corner prospect. Long and rangy.
 R.J. Stanford 0.5 Special teams gunner with speed.  Not afraid to hit. The fact that I played against him in high school doesn’t hurt his chance to make the roster.
0
FS1  Dwight Lowery 0.5 A corner convert with the skill to excel against tight ends in man coverage. Only played safety for a year – inconsistent with incredibly high upside. In the case of devastating injuries to the corner position, he can back up the nickel spot.
SS1  Danieal Manning 2.5 One of the surest tackling safeties in the NFL. He and Lowery were both huge reasons for Houston and Jacksonville (respectively) leaping up the pass defense ranks from 2010 to 2011.
FS2  Craig Steltz 0.5 A special teamer who became a starter for Chicago last year due to injuries at the position.  Played very well in the starting role when given the chance.  Will backup both safety positions for us and come on the field for big nickel packages.
SS2  Melvin Bullitt 0.5 Veteran who will primarily play special teams (if he can stay healthy).
Linebacker Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
SLB1  Ahmad Brooks 3.5 Does a little bit of everything. Sets the edge well in the run game, can rush the passer, and is underrated as a pass defender.  Can line up as a base defensive end in nickel packages as well.
MLB1  A.J. Hawk 3 Thumper linebacker. Has never played 4-3 MLB, but we’re running an even front, so he’ll be lined up over a guard anyways.  He, the nose tackle, and the base end must be counted on to shut down the inside run game by themselves.
WLB1  Akeem Ayers 3 Run and chase linebacker with a llot of upside.  If we can keep him clean, he can rack up the tackles.
MLB3  Russell Allen 1 Can backup both the MLB and WLB spots and plays special teams.
 Travis LaBoy 0.5 The homeless man’s version of Brooks. Backup SLB, DE in nickel.
 Andra Davis 0.5 A veteran who will back Hawk up.
 Brian Rolle 0.5 Sub package linebacker. Undersized, but fast. Has starting experience.
Defensive End and Tackle Depth Chart
Starting Position Role (optional) Name Value Commentary (Why you picked the player: specific skills and talents you like, potential upside, and fit within the system)
RDE1  Robert Quinn 8.5 The LEO – he is the key to our defense. He must get pressure. He can stand up, line up wide, move around – but he’s going to be moving forward 95% of the time. Has a ton of upside as a pass rusher in the NFL and is only scratching the surface of what he can do.
RDE2 Shea McClellin 4.5 We’re going to cross train him at SLB and LEO. Incredibly versatile – athletic and relentless pass rusher who knows how to get skinny through rush lanes.  Played well in coverage when asked to do so at the Senior Bowl (he also played some 4-3 MLB there in practice, if I recall).
RDE3  George Selvie 0.5 Reserve LEO. Here for depth purposes only.
LDE1  Leger Douzable 1 Our base left end. Strong against the run. Can rush a little when he kicks inside.
DT2  Allen Bailey 1 Interior nickel pass rusher who will also provide depth at base end.
0
DT1 Situational FB  Terrance Knighton 0.5 Our “1″ technique. Knighton has shown that when he’s motivated and in shape, he can shut down  an opponent’s run game damn near by himself.  His size and quickness command double teams at all times when he’s on his game.  Knighton’s major issue, however, is consistency.  He’s prone to letting his weight get out of control, and his snaps need to be somewhat monitored to really get the most out of him week-to-week.  He will also be our fullback in goal line situations – a la William Perry.  Has the potential to be a cornerstone defensive player for .5.  When he’s off his game, though, our defensive will be incredibly vulnerable to the inside run.
DT3  Corey Peters 0.5 3rd defensive tackle who can back up both the “1″ and the “3″ techniques. Valuable depth at this cost.
DT4  Stephen Paea 0.5 Has some upside as a pass rusher.  Developing him as a “3″ technique.  Will get snaps in pass situations.
LDE2  Pernell McPhee 3.5 Our starting “3″ technique.  Like Allen Bailey, he was an incredibly efficient inside pass rusher last year in his limited snaps (thanks to PFF again for the grades).  At this point, he’s an unknown quantity vs the run, playing only in sub packages for Baltimore last year.  With the 40 Under alignment we’ll be running, we’ll be isolating him against guards and letting him wreak havoc in the backfield – playing the run on the way to the quarterback.
Kicker and Punter Depth Chart
Starters Name Value Commentary (Why did you choose the player for special teams and what Role (optional) will he play?)
K1 Ryan Longwell 0.5 Cheap.
P1 Nick Harris 0.5 Again, cheap.
Kick Coverage Team
Role (optional) Name Commentary (Why did you choose the player for special teams and what Role (optional) will he play?)
OU1 RJ Stanford
OU2 Will Middleton
OU3 Craig Steltz
OU4 Melvin Bullitt
OU5 Janoris Jenkins
OU6 Louis Murphy
IN1 Ryan Longwell
IN2 Russell Allen
IN3 Tom Crabtree
IN4 Brian Rolle
IN5 Travis Laboy
Punt Coverage Team
Role (optional) Name Commentary (Why did you choose the player for special teams and what Role (optional) will he play?)
Gunner(SE1) RJ Stanford
Gunner(SE2) Louis Murphy
RG Tom Crabtree
LS Ryan Wendell
LG Travis Laboy
SB1 Will Middleton
SB2 Craig Steltz
RT James Hanna
LT Russell Allen
Backup Nick Harris
PP Brian Rolle
Categories: RSP Writers ProjectTags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

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